Saturday, March 3

Make a Difference Day Returns March 3


Plans are under way for the second annual Make a Difference Day, a day of service focused on the eight elementary schools across the Plateau. Sponsored by South Cumberland Community Fund (SCCF), last year’s event brought together more than 400 volunteers to paint murals, organize libraries, clean out gardens, and generally support the local schools in completing projects that may not fit into their regular budgets.
SCCF has allocated $1,000 for each of the schools, which include Sewanee Elementary, Monteagle Elementary, and the six elementary schools of Grundy County. AmeriCorps VISTA members are currently working with school principals and staff to determine projects that can be completed in the four hour period.
Nicky Hamilton, SCCF’s Community Development Director, observed, “It was refreshing to see so much positive energy being put to such great use last year. I hope everyone will mark their calendars to be part of this community effort again.”
The service day will run from 8 a.m. to noon and will be held rain or shine. All volunteers will receive T-shirts, and a light breakfast will be available. As an added activity, volunteers will write letters of thanks to all school employees and local first responders. Sign-ups will be available online and at each school starting in February.
For more information contact AmeriCorps VISTA Adele McAllister at <sccfvista@gmail.com> or visit SCCF’s website at www.southcumberlandcommunityfund.org.

Saturday, February 17

Monteagle Baseball Sign-Ups


The following is the schedule for youth baseball sign-ups in Monteagle. Registration will be at City Hall for ages four to 12.
A birth certificate is required and the fee is $50, which includes a uniform and trophy.
Monday through Friday in January and February, registration is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
On Saturday, Jan. 13, registration is 10–11 a.m., as well as on Saturday, Feb. 17.

Thursday, February 15

Performance of Macbeth in Honor of Ann Jennalie Cook


The Sewanee School of Letters presents the American Shakespeare Center in a performance of Macbeth. The play will be performed at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 15, in Guerry Auditorium. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., with period music from the company beginning at that time. This performance is free and open to the public.
The performance will be in memory of the School of Letters faculty member Ann Jennalie Cook, distinguished Shakespeare scholar, who passed away last summer. Through the generosity of one of Ann’s many grateful students at the School of Letters, we are able to honor her with this performance of Macbeth.
The American Shakespeare Center (ASC) in Staunton, Va., recovers the joys and accessibility of Shakespeare’s theatre, language and humanity by exploring the English Renaissance stage and its practices through performance and education. The ASC Blackfriars Playhouse, the world’s only re-creation of Shakespeare’s indoor theatre, is open year-round for productions of classic and modern plays, which have been hailed by The Washington Post as “shamelessly entertaining” and by The Boston Globe as “phenomenal…bursting with energy.”
The ASC brings a unique performance style to Sewanee, blending Shakespeare’s stagecraft with modern sensibility. The company uses Shakespeare’s Staging Conditions: universal lighting, minimal sets, character doubling, cross-gender casting, and live music. Shakespeare’s performance company couldn’t turn the lights out on the audience; actors and audience shared the same light. The ASC shares light with the audience throughout the performance for a unique brand of audience contact rarely seen in theatre today.
This performance has been made possible by the support of the Sewanee Performing Arts Series, the Department of English, the Department of Humanities, the Department of Theater and Dance, the Department of Medieval Studies, Writing Across the Curriculum, and the Center for Speaking and Learning. We are most grateful to Ann’s School of Letters student for her generous contribution that makes this performance possible. For more information go to letters.sewanee.edu/readings/.

Sunday, February 11

MJQ Redux: Celebrating Jazz at Sewanee


A landmark concert in the history of American music gets long overdue recognition in February. Back in April 1961, eight years before the Woodstock Festival and eight years after Duke Ellington’s last pop hit, the Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ) was heard for the first time in the South, performing to a rapt audience at the University of the South. At this point the progressive MJQ was not yet the household name it would become later; it had landed in Sewanee entirely thanks to the efforts of the student Jazz Society. The University, lacking a real concert hall, offered up its gymnasium one Sunday afternoon for a superb concert in the round by the MJQ. That gym, named for a segregationist, hosted hundreds of listeners in one of the first integrated events to occur on campus—or anywhere in that region.
At 2 p.m. CST, Sunday, Feb. 11, in Guerry Hall, the University of the South pays tribute to that landmark event by hosting another momentous concert, the Aaron Diehl Quartet in performance, reviving the songs played by the MJQ back in ’61. Aaron Diehl, celebrated for his virtuosity as both jazz and classical pianist, brings the outstanding vibraphonist Warren Wolf along with Paul Sikivie, bass, and Peter Van Nostrand, drums—altogether forming an ensemble exceptionally capable of handling the MJQ book.
In the preceding days, Feb. 9–10, the University also hosts a symposium dedicated to the music of the MJQ. The symposium assembles several leading names in jazz studies, including Gary Giddins, featured expert in Ken Burns’ “Jazz” and author of “Visions of Jazz and Bing Crosby: Swinging on a Star”; and George Schuller, drummer with the Lee Konitz Quartet and son of famed composer and jazz advocate Gunther Schuller.
For more information about specific dates, times, locations and registration and ticket charges, visit www.sewanee.edu/mjqinsewanee.

Saturday, February 10

Mardi Gras Fundraiser for Good Shepherd


The Good Shepherd Parish Community will celebrate Mardi Gras with a fundraising gala from 6–11 p.m., on Saturday, Feb. 10, at Monterey Station in Cowan.
The evening will feature Cajun cuisine along with live music, dancing, a cash bar and a silent auction. Participants must by 21 or older to attend. Tickets are $45 per person in advance or $50 at the door and can be purchased by calling Janie Casey at (931) 308-7116, or the Good Shepherd Parish Office, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. at (931) 967-0961.
Proceeds will benefit Good Samaritan, the Linda Bauman Memorial Scholarship Fund and the Good Shepherd Parish Ministries. For more information go to <http://www.goodshepherdtn.com/mardi-gras-fundraiser>.

Thursday, February 8

Modern and Contemporary Art Exhibit at University Archives Gallery


The exhibition “Modern and Contemporary Art: Selected Works from the Permanent Art Collection” will be on display at the University of the South in the University Archives Gallery from Feb. 5–July 31, 2018. Representative works from the early 20th century will be shown, including artists Kathe Kollowitz, Alexander Calder and Josef Albers. More recent work by Robert Rauschenberg and the conceptual photographs of Laurel Nakadate will also be on exhibit.
Many of the works of art are from generous donations received by the University or purchases made by University acquisitions. Dr. Jeffrey Thompson, chair of the Art, Art History, and Visual Studies Department, will give a talk about some of the highlights of the exhibition at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 8, in the Lytle Reading Room in University Archives. A reception will follow.

Sewanee Emeritus Association


The Sewanee Emeritus Association announces its first program for the Easter semester. All meetings are open to the public and are at 3:30 p.m. in the Torian Room of duPont Library.
On Thursday, Feb. 8, Professor of Forestry and Geology Ken Smith will speak about his role of University forester and research on the Domain as well as his responsibilities as Assistant Dean for the Environment.

Tuesday, February 6

New Sewanee Seminars Short Courses


The Center of Lifelong Learning at the University of the South is excited to announce three new short courses, open to all.
The enrollment fee for each course is only $60 and includes six hours of formal learning time. Contact Dan Backlund at <lifelong@sewanee.edu> for information and to register for these exciting classes—spaces are filling up fast.
John Reishman, Professor Emeritus of English, is offering an in depth look at six important Robert Browning dramatic monologues guaranteed to challenge your moral categories and values and perhaps change your preconceptions about Victorian poetry. “Moral Anesthesia: Robert Browning’s Dramatic Monologues” will be offered 9–11 a.m., Mondays, Jan. 29, Feb. 5, Feb. 12 and Feb. 19.
Maryellen McCone and Richard Barrali, certified trainers in Mindful Self Compassion, are offering a course exposing participants to the benefits of mindfulness meditation practice that can allow us to change our response to life’s inherent stress and live in a state of equanimity. “Hit the Reset Button!” will be offered 10 a.m.–noon, Thursdays, Feb. 1, Feb. 8, Feb. 15 and Feb. 22.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics Laurence Alvarez is looking at how simple substitution cyphers like Edgar Allen Poe’s in “The Gold Bug” can lead us to understanding computer encoding and then to potential encryption techniques that might be developed when more powerful computers are available. “Secret Messages—Old and new methods of encryption” will be offered 1–3 p.m., Tuesdays, Feb. 6, Feb. 13, Feb. 20 and Feb. 27.

Saturday, February 3

Cowan/Sewanee Baseball Sign-Ups Begin Jan. 24


Cowan/Sewanee Little League will have baseball/softball sign-ups at two locations this year. Register at Sewanee Elementary from 2:30–5 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 24, or 3–5 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 1.
Register at Cowan Elementary from 9 a.m.–noon, Saturday, Jan. 27, or 9 a.m.–noon, Saturday, Feb. 3.
The fee is $45 for one player. There is a discounted rate for families with more than one player. For two players it is $60, and for three or more players the fee is $75.
Please bring a birth certificate, proof of residence or a school form showing enrollment at Cowan, Sewanee or South Middle school.
Volunteers and coaches are needed for this season. For more information contact Tina Lindsey at (931) 703-6657, Sarah Gore at (931) 691-5586 or Amanda Knight at (931) 691-0962.

Thursday, February 1

Lifelong Learning to Meet Feb. 1


The Sewanee Seminars Academy for Lifelong Learning welcomes botanist and writer Mary Priestley to the Thursday, Feb.1 meeting. Her topic will be “The South Cumberland Plateau-A Noah’s Ark for Plants.”
Priestley received her B.S. in forestry from the University of the South, a M.S. in biology from MTSU and a M.F.A. from the University of the South. For years she has served the Sewanee Herbarium, Friends of South Cumberland State Park and the Tennessee Native Plant Society. She is married to Mac Priestly and has three children and one grandchild. She is an accomplished writer and musician performing with the group Bazzania. Her newest book is titled “Little Brown Hen.”
Priestley’s talk will begin promptly at noon for one hour in Lower Cravens on the Sewanee campus. Coffee and cookies will be served. Any questions may be sent to <debrakandul@aol.com>.

Tuesday, January 30

Global Cybercrime Expert to Lecture Jan. 30


Greg Esslinger, C’91, a senior executive with an international risk management firm, will lecture on the rapidly evolving threats to businesses and individuals posed by cybercrime and corruption.
The speech, titled “Collision of Cultures: Cybercrime, Bribery and International Business,” takes place at 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 30, in Gailor Auditorium.
Esslinger is a senior partner at Control Risks, a global risk-management firm providing counsel to clients on crisis management, protecting employees in high-risk environments, defending against cybercriminals, and ensuring that firms are in compliance with international regulations on corruption.
Esslinger argues that the breadth and depth of digital interconnectedness is vastly expanding the risks individuals, companies and societies face. Not only are traditional criminals exploiting this networked world, but nation-states themselves and politically and socially motivated groups are emerging as a potent threat.
In addition to traditional crimes like extortion, bribery, and kidnapping, motivated by personal financial gain , new actors and governments are employing cybercrime techniques to achieve ideological and geo-strategic objectives.
The Internet of Things (IoT) connects billions of devices, ranging from mundane household thermostats to intricate global transport networks, exposes businesses, individuals and societies to a new level of vulnerability.
Esslinger calls the IoT “the front line choke point or attack point” for the wave of new cybercrime.
“The challenge,” he adds, “is making people aware and developing an understanding of the importance” of robust defenses against cybercrime. This task is made more complex by the stark differences in cultural, political, and historical values in different societies.
After graduating from Sewanee with an English major, Esslinger earned a law degree from Georgia State University College of Law.
He spent five years with the FBI, working on international terrorism and terrorist financing investigations. His career in the public and private sectors has taken him to more than 40 countries across the globe.
Esslinger’s visit to Sewanee is sponsored by the Babson Center for Global Commerce and the Office of the Dean of the College. He is the 2018 Easter Semester Bryan Viewpoints Speaker, a lecture series made possible by a generous gift from Peggy and J.F. Bryan IV, C’65.
For more information about the Babson Center or Esslinger’s visit, contact Stephanny Hopkins <skhopkins@sewanee.edu> or Stacey O’Sullivan <smosulli@sewanee.edu>.

Friday, January 26

Upcoming Meetings

Curbside Recycling
Residential curbside recycling pickup in Sewanee is on the first and third Friday of each month. Friday, Jan. 19, will be a pickup day.
Recyclable materials must be separated by type and placed in blue bags by the side of the road no later than 7:30 a.m. Please do not put out general household trash on this day. Blue bags may be picked up in the University Lease and Community Relations office, 400 University Ave. (the Blue House) or at the Physical Plant Services office on Georgia Ave.

FCDP Monthly Meeting
The Franklin County Democratic Party will meet at 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 20, in the small meeting room of the Franklin County Annex Building, 839 Dinah Shore Blvd., Winchester. Margaret Ottley from the Franklin County Election Commission will discuss voter registration and voter ID. Dwain Money from Almost Home will talk about the homeless situation in Winchester and Franklin County. All are invited to attend.

Coffee with the Coach
Coffee with the Coach, an opportunity to learn more about Sewanee’s sports teams, continues at 9 a.m., Monday, Jan. 22, with former coach, teacher, principal and now Director of Franklin County Schools, Stanley Bean. Gather at the Blue Chair Tavern for free coffee and conversation.

Sewanee Community Council
The next meeting of the Community Council is scheduled for 7 p.m., Monday, Jan. 22, at the Sewanee Senior Citizens’ Center. Agenda items include approval of the October minutes; housing study invitation, Reed; community/greek life clean-up day, Byerly; update on parks, Berner; announcements and/or questions.

Sewanee Utility District
The Sewanee Utility District of Franklin and Marion Counties Board of Commissioners will have its regular meeting at 5 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 23, at the utility office on Sherwood Road. If a customer is unable to attend but wishes to bring a matter to the board, call 598-5611, visit the office or call a board member. Your board members are Art Hanson, Randall Henley, Ronnie Hoosier, Charlie Smith and Karen Singer.

EQB Meeting
Members of the EQB Club will meet for lunch at noon, Wednesday, Jan. 24, at St. Mary’s Sewanee. The lead at 12:30 p.m. will be presented by Carolyn Fitz and Sally Hubbard on “Hiking the Last One Hundred Miles of ‘El Camino de Santiago’.”

DivorceCare
On Wednesday, Jan. 24, from 6–7:30 p.m., DivorceCare, a nationwide nondenominational support group for separated and divorced individuals will meet in Monteagle. Go to <www.divorcecare.org> and type in your zip code for further information on the Monteagle location and how to register. Contact Daniel or Becky Lehmann at <eaglesrest1517@gmail.com> or call (615) 294-4748.

Area Rotary Club Meetings
The Grundy County Rotary Club meets at 11:30 a.m., Tuesdays at Dutch Maid Bakery in Tracy City. The Monteagle Sewanee Rotary Club will meet at 8 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 25, at the Sewanee Inn. Rotary Youth Leadership (RYLA) participants from SAS will present the program.

Marion County Democratic Party Meeting
The MCDP will meet at 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 25, at the Kimball Town Hall, 675 Main St., Kimball. The guest speaker will be U.S. congressional candidate Steven Reynolds. All are invited to attend.

Monteagle Town Council
The Town of Monteagle Council will meet at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 31, at the Monteagle City Hall.

Monday, January 22

The Body Politic

The Body Politic features two solo works and a duet choreographed by Elizabeth Lentz-Hill and Kelly Ferris Lester. Lentz-Hill’s solo My Body Performs, Or a Clean Piko, investigates various aspects of one’s identity, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality, and how these are embedded in specific body parts. Lester’s solo, In Her Clothes, looks at the ways that women strive to succeed in a masculine world and the effects of this. People Issues, created by both performers, concludes the performance and uses magazine images, literally and figuratively, in showing how society expects bodies to be “performed.” As the piece unwinds, current issues are folded into the narrative as the dancers investigate the connections of self and society. The event concludes with a dialogue between performers, an invited guest speaker, and the audience.

Monday, January 22, 2018
7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Tennessee Williams Center’s Proctor Hill Theatre

Saturday, January 20

Senior Center Potluck

All are invited to attend the winter potluck lunch at the Sewanee Senior Center at noon, Saturday, Jan. 20. The program will be music performed by students of teacher Tammy Hobbs. Performing will be Addy Knight, piano; Sara Knight, piano; Maple Landis, violin; Eleanor Loose, piano; Mary Ming Lynch, piano; Iliana Pate, violin; Leonora Pate, violin; Verena Pate, violin; Sara Margaret Roberts, violin; Nicolas St.-Pierre, cello; and Stella Wilson, violin.

Join SOA for the Anniversary Women’s March


For its January meeting, Sewanee Organize and Act is on the move, with members fanning out to Nashville, Chattanooga or Huntsville to join the anniversary of the Women’s March, on Saturday, Jan. 20.
Last year’s Women’s March was held in Washington, D.C. and cities throughout the world on the day after the inauguration of President Trump. It was a call to advocate legislation and policies regarding human rights and other issues, including women’s rights, immigration reform, healthcare reform, reproductive rights, the natural environment, LGBTQ rights, racial equality, freedom of religion and workers’ rights.
Between three and five million people participated nationwide, including people from Sewanee. Sid Brown and Lucia Dale were among those who traveled to Washington, D.C., which drew between 440,000 and 500,000 marchers. Following the march, the organizers posted the “10 Actions for the first 100 Days” campaign for joint activism to keep up the momentum.
Brown said, “Being part of the Women’s March 2017 allowed me to experience fully how many people feel as I do.”
“The importance of being part of the DC Women’s March was proof positive that there were still a lot of good people and here they were and we didn’t have to be mistrustful of those around us,” said Dale.  “There were so many of us who were not the same, but like-minded in this way.”
Anyone interested in carpooling or who may need a ride to any of the following three marches may contact SOA for more information at <sewaneeorganizeandact@gmail.com>.
To see an event map with links to every Women’s March in the country, go to <powertothepolls.com/anniversary>.
Sewanee Organize and Act, which follows the Indivisible Model, was founded in early 2017 to champion progressive values and oppose an agenda that will take America backwards. SOA models the values of inclusion, respect and fairness. For more information, see the SOA Facebook page or email <sewaneeorganizeandact@gmail.com>.

Friday, January 19

The Invisible King, Carlos Gallery

The Carlos Gallery in the Nabit Art Building at the University of the South is pleased to present The Invisible King, an exhibition of photographs and sculptures by Nashville artist Hans Schmitt-Matzen.

In juxtaposing the media of painting, photography, and sculpture—the natural and the man-made—Hans Schmitt-Matzen’s work suggests a universal gestural language that may exist in the form of a waterfall, the spine of a book, or the stoke of a brush.

In The Invisible King, Schmitt-Matzen translates the drawings of his two young sons into larger wall sculptures.  The sustained process of deciphering his children’s innate language of marks allows him to discover shared aspects of the human condition and gain a greater understanding of what they think and feel. Often these collaborative creations are realized as neon signs, a grand medium designed for announcements within the public sphere.  The neon artworks are essentially light drawings, poetic non-objects that harness a symbol of the sublime and unruly.  Schmitt-Matzen states, “Light is the fastest thing that we know and that makes it a perfect metaphor for representing fleeting moments of comprehension.”

Other pieces in the exhibition originate from drawings made by his own hand while he attempts to absorb his children’s unrestricted sense of play. He states, “I work as they work, and generate hundreds of simple line drawings.  I make selections from these drawings looking for forms that are simultaneously identifiable as signifiers and yet mysteriously unreadable. I talk to my boys about their interpretations of the lines and those conversations guide many decisions.” Often the final works are made from wood and sculpture compounds to appear as though they were relics of an ancient time. They are like stone ciphers meant to decode some enduring universal message.

Hans Schmitt-Matzen received his BFA from Middle Tennessee State University with an emphasis in painting and a minor in philosophy. His work has recently been exhibited in group shows at MDR in Germany, Like the Spice Gallery in Brooklyn, Track 13 Gallery and Zeitgeist Gallery in Nashville, Salisbury University Gallery in Baltimore. He has had solo exhibitions at Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, David Lusk Gallery, Nashville International Airport, and Material. Schmitt-Matzen often collaborates with Brooklyn, NY based photographer Gieves Anderson and is actively involved in curatorial work for both private clients and public institutions. He was a board member of Fugitive Projects, and was a founding member of COOP Gallery. Since 2004, Schmitt-Matzen has been a staff member of the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville, where he currently holds the position of assistant director of internal affairs.

Artist Talk and Opening Reception Friday, January 19, 4:30 p.m.

Friday, January 19, 2018
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Carlos Gallery in the Nabit Art Building

Winter Convocation, University of the South

David Crabtree to give Convocation address Jan. 19
The University’s Winter Convocation will be held at 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19, in All Saints' Chapel. Honorary degrees will be presented and new members will be inducted into the Order of the Gown. The Rev. David Crabtree, an award-winning broadcast journalist as well as an ordained deacon, will give the Convocation address and will receive an honorary degree. An honorary degree will be conferred also upon costume designer Toni-Leslie James, associate professor at Virginia Commonwealth University.
Convocation will be streamed live for those who are unable to attend.

Upcoming Meetings and Events

Coffee with the Coach
Coffee with the Coach, an opportunity to learn more about Sewanee’s sports teams, continues at 9 a.m., Monday, Jan. 15, with Tommy Atwood, former baseball and football coach at University of Miami and University of Florida (23 years) and former SEC men’s and women’s basketball official. Gather at the Blue Chair Tavern for free coffee and conversation.

Sewanee Book Club
The Book Club will have a meeting at 1:30 p.m., Monday, Jan. 15, at Otey Parish in the Adult Education Room. This is our annual Book Sharing meeting to discuss new and favorite books.
For more information or directions contact Debbie Racka at 692-6088 or <debbie811123@gmail.com>, or Flournoy Rogers at 598-0733 or <semmesrogers@gmail.com>. Visitors are welcome.

STHP Meeting at All Saints’
The Sewanee Trust for Historic Preservation plans a public program at All Saints’ Chapel on University Avenue at 2 p.m., Monday, Jan. 15. Beginning at St. Augustine’s Chapel, near the Chaplain’s office, Waring McCrady will speak about the University chapel’s stained glass windows, and in particular the one depicting the youth of Christ. Those assembled will move into All Saints’ nave for viewing of the stained glass while daylight illuminates the windows. Please join our lively group and its erudite speaker for a special and entertaining afternoon.

Hospitality Shop Hours
The Hospitality Shop will reopen at 9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16. The Hospitality Shop is a division of the Emerald-Hodgson Auxiliary, staffed by volunteers, and located at 1096 University Ave. Proceeds from sales are used for scholarships for area students wishing to enter health care professions, and for the physical therapists at our local hospital to assist with their continuing education. For more information call (931) 598-0136 during hours of operation or email <hospitalityshop11@gmail.com>.

Franklin County Commissioners
The Franklin County Commissioners will meet at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Franklin County Courthouse in Winchester.

DivorceCare
On Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 6–7:30 p.m., DivorceCare, a nationwide nondenominational support group for separated and divorced individuals will meet in Monteagle. Go to <www.divorcecare.org> and type in your zip code for further information on the Monteagle location and how to register. Contact Daniel or Becky Lehmann at <eaglesrest1517@gmail.com> or call (615) 294-4748.

EQB Meeting
Members of the EQB Club will meet for lunch on Wednesday, Jan. 17, at St. Mary’s Sewanee.

Area Rotary Club Meetings
The Grundy County Rotary Club meets at 11:30 a.m., Tuesdays at Dutch Maid Bakery in Tracy City. The Monteagle Sewanee Rotary Club will meet at 8 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 18, at the Sewanee Inn. Spike Hosch will present the program on the goals and key initiatives of the Community Development Finance Institution.

FCRP Chili Supper
The Franklin County Republican Party (FCRP) is having its annual chili supper at the Red Roof Pavilion in the Winchester City Park at 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 18. The new FCHS Young Republican Club will be introduced along with the sponsors. Amy Dennis, field representative of Congressman DesJarlais, will also be introduced. All Republican candidates will be recognized. This event is free and the public is invited.

Curbside Recycling
Residential curbside recycling pickup in Sewanee is on the first and third Friday of each month. Friday, Jan. 19, will be a pickup day.
Recyclable materials must be separated by type and placed in blue bags by the side of the road no later than 7:30 a.m. Please do not put out general household trash on this day. Blue bags may be picked up in the University Lease and Community Relations office, 400 University Ave. (the Blue House) or at the Physical Plant Services office on Georgia Ave.

Sewanee Community Council
The next meeting of the Community Council is scheduled for 7 p.m., Monday, Jan. 22, at the Sewanee Senior Citizens’ Center.

Sewanee Utility District
The Sewanee Utility District of Franklin and Marion Counties Board of Commissioners will have its regular meeting at 5 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 23, at the utility office on Sherwood Road. If a customer is unable to attend but wishes to bring a matter to the board, call 598-5611, visit the office or call a board member. Your board members are Art Hanson, Randall Henley, Ronnie Hoosier, Charlie Smith and Karen Singer.

Monteagle Town Council
The Town of Monteagle Council will meet at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 31, at the Monteagle City Hall. Please note the change of date.

Monday, January 15

MLK Community Celebration


The 33rd annual Martin Luther King Day Community Celebration will take place on Monday, Jan. 15, at 5:30 p.m. in Upper Cravens Hall at 435 Kentucky Ave. The program will celebrate the life and works of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The community is invited to come out and take part in the annual potluck dinner.
 Vice Chancellor John McCardell will give the opening remarks. Students will host the program and share poetry and dance. The School of Theology Choir, under the direction of Kenneth Miller, will perform musical selections. The Sewanee Praise Choir, under the Direction of Music Professor Prakash Wright, will perform selections from their songbook. Attendees will have the opportunity to join in song.
The evening is always a great community celebration. Attendees will enjoy good company, inspiring music and nourishing food.
The Sewanee Black Student Union, the Cumberland Center for Justice and Peace, the School of Theology, the Office of Multi-Cultural Affairs, and the Office of Student Life are the co-sponsors. The event is free, open, and the community is invited.

SAS Marks MLK Day with Special Events


St. Andrew’s-Sewanee School will mark the celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day with two days of special events commemorating the life and work of Dr. King and the civil rights movement.
On Sunday, Jan. 14, at 1 p.m., the Reverend Francis Walter and his wife, Faye, will share “Reflections on Selma and the Early Civil Rights Movement” in St. Andrew’s Chapel. A native of Mobile, Ala.,and a graduate of the School of Theology (Sewanee), Fr. Walter was ordained in the Diocese of Alabama. Fr. and Mrs. Walter were both active in the Selma Inter-religious Project and the Freedom Quilting Bee. Fr. Walter will read a chapter from his forthcoming book about his meeting with Dr. King and share photographs from the period.
At 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, SAS students will have an opportunity to view the movie “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” at the Sewanee Union Theatre. The 2013 film is a slightly fictionalized account of the life of Cecil Gaines who served eight presidents during his tenure as a butler at the White House. The film chronicles how the civil rights movement, Vietnam, and other major events of the time affected this Mr. Gaines’ life, family and American society. On Sunday evening, the school’s regularly scheduled Compline service will include special readings to mark the holiday.
Monday, Jan. 15 will begin with a Holy Eucharist service for the school community at 8 a.m. in St. Andrew’s Chapel. Head of School Karl Sjolund will deliver a sermon inspired by Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and work. Throughout the day, students and faculty will have opportunities to more deeply explore the meaning of the day. Opportunities will include faculty and student presentations on global activism, local activism, religion and civil rights, and politics and civil rights. The presentations will be in the school’s Agee Library. A set of social justice inspired prints will be on display in the front hall of the school’s academic building and a reception with light refreshments will be held during the morning break in classes. During the lunch hour, students, faculty and staff will have the opportunity to participate in activities and discussions to mark the day.
“It is important to the SAS community that we use the opportunity of Martin Luther King Jr. Day for education, both in our usual class schedule and through these specially scheduled events,” said SAS history department coordinator Geoffrey Smith who spearheaded organization of the day. “Dr. King’s commitment to education, civil rights, social justice and the promise of America is an inspiring message and provides us with much material for reflection and discussion.”
Monday, Jan.15 is also a Shadow Day at SAS for students in grades five–11 who are interested in exploring the option of St. Andrew’s-Sewanee School. For more information about having your child attend SAS on Monday, Jan.15, contact <admission@sasweb.org>.